25 June 2017

My Week In Photos: 6.17.17 // 6.24.17

Given the long long hiatus on my blog, and the sheer madness of my work schedule (all good! just busy), I took a note from the old book of Moriah Spicer and thought I could work through some of the many things I'm seeing throughout my week, a la My Week In Photos. Some weeks are quieter than others. June has been a whirlwind: three exhibitions opening at the Hirshhorn in three weeks, all projects I'm supporting. First was Nicolas Party's sunrise, sunset on the third floor Inner Ring - a large-scale mural project painted over the course of two weeks by Party. Last weekend we opened Yoko Ono: Four Works for Washington, DC and the World, which began with the activation of the interactive work "My Mommy Is Beautiful" and the re-opening of the "Wish Tree" in our sculpture garden. Ai Weiwei: Trace at Hirshhorn opens this Tuesday, and then I'm off to Maine with Mari for a few days of cool air, lobster, blueberry pancakes, and sleep. 


My Mommy Is Beautiful, a work by Yoko Ono that prompts museum visitors to react to the theme of motherhood through text and images, moments before it opened to the public.



My Mommy Is Beautiful, starting to fill in.



Wish Tree for Washington, DC was planted at the Hirshhorn by Yoko Ono in 2007. Visitors are invited to write down their wishes and tie them to the tree. The wishes are periodically "harvested" throughout the summer, and will later be sent to Iceland to be archived in the Peace Tower. Imagine Peace. Photo by HM Watt.



Alexandra Bell's A Teenager with Promise wheat-pasted on U Street. Saw this shortly after hearing the Philando Castille verdict. Was truly stopped in my tracks.


Currently reading: Joan Didion's "South and West: From a Notebook." The first four sentences of this section are written with such clarity. I aspire to write this simply. As an aside, this text was written in 1970 while Didion traveled across the deep south, and much of these segments address racial inequality in a way that feels ripe and prescient in 2017. In light of the nooses that were recently found planted on both my museum's campus and the National Museum of African American History and Culture, it feels crucial to be reading works like this, alongside some of the other texts I'm pouring through like Angela Davis' "Are Prisons Obsolete"; Zora Neale Hurston's "Their Eyes Were Watching God"; and Ralph Ellison's "Invisible Man".



Finally had a chance to take my time in the galleries at the National Museum of African American History and Culture. I was moved to tears in the Emmett Till Memorial gallery.


Left a note on the My Mommy Is Beautiful wall for my mother.


One of the hundreds of anonymous wishes left behind.


Stopped by the NGA with my Aunt Maria (after running through the Hirshhorn with her). Took a moment with the gorgeous Rothkos.


Baked chocolate cupcakes for a colleague who is leaving us after six dedicated years.


A tee-shirt I designed (with my favorite photo of myself on it) arrived in the mail this week!! Wore it to work with a high waisted skirt and it was an absolute hit.


Took Aunt Maria to the American Art Museum to point of the Nam Jun Paik, Mickalene Thomas, and dance across the Carl Andre. We went for burgers around the corner afterwards at Red Apron.


A new friend from the Hirshhorn is starting a job at another Smithsonian. We took him out for drinks, and caught an unreal sunset in the alley behind A&D. It's nights like these where I want someone to pinch me. The skies in DC, the light, the color, the community. All of it.


And don't even get me started on the plantlife here... what am I even looking at? I snapped this just across the bridge that connects Woodley Park to Dupont and I'm still processing the sweet tangy smell of these beauties. 


High school reunion in DC last night with the lovely Aileen and Alison. So glad these two ladies were able to convene. Chatting about high school, about the struggles of our late 20's, about career goals, about the future. All I can say is, these women are both rockstars.

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